Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation

Juvenile rehabilitation centers should address treatment needs, skill development and successful re-integration of juveniles into the society

Juvenile Crime

Juvenile Crime

All juveniles have individual strengths that can be identified, built on, and employed to prevent future delinquency

Youth Activities

Youth Activities

Engaging a community and neighborhood that promote and foster healthy activities for juveniles

Life-Skills

Life-Skills

Availability of economic and other resources exposes juveniles in attaining multiple experiences that supports their life-skills

Family Support

Family Support

Participation in shared activities between youth and family (including siblings and parents) is key to positive re-integration of juveniles

 

Mentoring released juveniles

Kibera Hamlets showcasing their acrobatic skills

Denis (bottom) with the Kibera Hamlets showcasing their acrobatic skills

Denis is one out of many recovering juveniles in Kibera slums. He explains how his teenage life was marred by family struggles. His parents separated while he was only five years old and had to be brought up by his mother who relied on selling second hand clothes in the famous Gikomba market.
However his legal troubles started at around the age of 13 about the time his mother, who was the only bread winner succumbed to a cancerous disease. Faced with the reality of fending for the rest of siblings, he dropped out of school and joined a gang, mugging neighbouring residents and engaging in burglary.
His gang activities did not last before he got into the wrong arms of the law. He was arrested and detained at Youth Correctional and Training Centre, Kamiti prison. His siblings were handed over to Upendo Orphanage which provides rehabilitation and accommodation for destitute children.
“In the prison we went through various training, equipping us with life support skills”, he said.
At the facility, juveniles are offered free training on various fields, agriculture being one of them.
While in prison, he was introduced to Fr. Peter Meienberg, a Catholic priest who runs Faraja Trust. The organization offer juvenile offenders’ opportunities that help to reduce juvenile recidivism.
“I was able to learn basic computer skills and also excelled in creative arts. Upon exit from the prison, Faraja Trust linked me with one of the performing arts groups known as Kibera Hamlets Acrobats”, he adds.
Denis appreciates this form of transition that has helped him to disengage in criminal activities. He says that the group has enabled him to travel and perform in Europe, a dream he never thought of. At the moment, he also trains and runs mentorship program, supporting released juveniles in coping up with challenges of re-integration.
Asked about his advice to the youth, he said that crime is not a solution no matter how one struggles, and change is the only road to success.

—Ends—

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